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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
to most of us. bell about sharing one of your typical days at the court. >> when i say it most of you won't want the job. [laughter] you know, we have spent most of our base reading. we read briefs. we read amicus briefs which are by the court. we read the record that has been created below, the decisions of courts across the country who have faced the question. we then research and we right in we right and then we added. and almost every day we are reading research and writing. it does not sound very exciting. then our opinion gets published. all of that thinking gets shown to the world. and it is what people look at. they don't really realize how much we have to do to get their, and it is work to get there, hard work. and remembering that every decision we make their is a wonder and their is a loser. if they don't like what we have done the don't think we're smart. they think really is a. they think we are doing it based on policy. the somehow we just don't like what they like. it is so far from the truth. judging is a skill, a profession . you are trained to look at issues in a legal w
china, the u.s., now canada, even leaders doesn't permit us to monitor. doesn't permit us to report to international body. doesn't permit an international body to tell us what to do with emission. sovereignty has become the obstacle to cooperation and increasely made states look more and more dysfunctional. how is that the most powerful, well equipped military nation in the world has ever seen the united states of america can't bring a handful of terrorists to heal in benghazi or mali, or afghanistan. the asymmetry between a massive military based on big ships, planes, and bombs and the reality of every day -- cross borders that a symmetry means that the war machine, the war machine of the greatest state there ever was is largelier relevant to the security threats we face. as we learn on 9/11 when in this city, a handful of hijackers living in the united states for years hijacked our planes and turned them to weapons. they didn't have to be given weapons by anyone. they seize them and use them and created devastation here. that, again, is a sign of this new asymmetry. and you find i
. howard, will you dot honors? [applause] >> u.s. senator, vice president of the united states, nobel peace prize recipient, as cor winner, best selling author, any one of these superlatives alone would be enough to suggest that our next speaker is a force with which to be reckoned, but when combined into one individual, it is evident that al gore is a force of nature. he is always been on the leading edge of promoting the internet as a tool for greater communication, of climate change as one of the greatest perils of our time, and in his latest book, "the future," of the key medical technological, and philosophical drivers checking our world. ever the big picture thinker, al gore explores how we may harness these epic change agents for the good. although his public professionalized had it not been without controversy, his record of accomplishments speak to the life lived on the precipice of passion, purpose, and possibility. on behalf of the savannah book festival, it is by great honor to introduce to all of you al gore. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, thank you. t
. the policy of our country, foreign policy, all the instruments of power it that you use to frame a policy must be driven with some higher purpose. i mentioned purpose, we lost purpose. we have been about ricocheting crisis to crisis. there's no strategic thinking, hasn't been strategic thinking for a long time in our foreign policy. it is the point i keep making. so does dick lugar who is one of the most accomplished foreign policy thinkers in the country as i do joe biden, one of the best. they talked about this for years. you must frame a strategic context first and then you frame the policy to fit the strategic context, the national interest of your country. what john bose. millennium john's account. that was one of the more creative things we have done. it is bigger than that. until we get a president that does that, then is able to implement, by the way in partnership with the congress, doesn't mean the congress has to agree with everything but you can't treat article i of the constitution like it is an appendix, like it is a nuisance. if for no other reason you can't sustain a forei
you think of our programming this weekend. you can tweak us on booktv, comment on our facebook call or send us an e-mail, booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> now on c-span2 we bring you booktv, 48 hours of nonfiction authors and books. here are some programs to look out for this weekend. at 5:00 p.m. eastern, ben shapiro argues liberals believe their competition discouraging political debate. at 2:00 a.m. michele alexander opines that policies from the 70s for and acted to push back gains made during the civil-rights movement. on sunday with recent policy debates on immigration we bring you stories from immigrants who share their experiences on booktv at 4:00 p.m. eastern. at 11:00 p.m. sunday melvin goodman argues the government is spending excessively on defense making us less secure. watch these programs and more all weekend long on booktv. for complete schedule visit booktv.org. up next on booktv cita stelzer talks about the dinner hosted by winston churchill during and after world war ii which were used to persuade world leaders to adopt his position on variou
just joined us from the city, and he is setting up. we welcome you, doug. dougie is all over the world. as such, he has lived quite a bit of time in japan himself. it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see. in terms of this whole notion of the book, by the way, a very modest title, banker to the world. when i heard of this, and i am a very close, personal friend of bill's, like everyone in this room is. and so when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about to lessons of debt crises and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot, what we needed to the will to do. so we were able to convince them. so no i'm not talking to you about this -- talking to you as his friend but his publisher. we had this decision. we were going to do this book, and we did. the ink was that even dry when henry kissinger came out and said, this is a must-read for anybody in any section at any level of the finance industry. no sooner did he do that than paul volcker came out and what to make a comment about how this is a must read. it is a must rea
which were used to persuade world leaders to adopt his position on various matters. it's about 40 minutes. >> good evening. thank you all for coming. i'm delighted to see you here to talk about my new book, "dinner with churchill: policy making at the dinner table." since my book is all about the importance of dinners, be assured that i will not make you late for your own dippers. -- dinners. i will be brief, i just want to whet your appetite so that you'll buy my book. do you want to -- let's try another sentence. i have lived with winston churchill for four years, and it was wonderful. even though that took place in the frigid archives after churchill college. i'm often asked where i got the idea for still another book on churchill to add to the thousands already written. well, i've read many books about this fascinating man and notice that many of his important accomplishments were achieved at dinners, sometimes at lunches. so i began to wonder why that was so, why most of the deals that were struck at the famous international conferences held during world war ii were made at o
churchill used to persuade world leaders to don't his position on various matters. it's about forty minutes. [inaudible conversations] good evening. thank you for coming. i'm delighted to see you here to talk about my new book "dinner with churchill: policy-making at the dinner table." since my book is all about the importance and dinners be assuredly not make you late for your own dinners. i will be brief. i want to whet your appetite so you'll buy my book. you want to -- i have lived with wrurnlg winston churchill for four years. it was wonderful. even though it took place in churchill college. i'm asked where i got the idea to add to the thousand already written. i have read many books about the man and notice many of the important accomplishments were achieved at dinners. sometimes at luncheons. so i began to wonder why that was so. why most of the deals that were struck at the famous international conferences held during world war ii were made at or facilitated by dinners at which the leaders were more relaxed in a formal session. so i began digging in to the churchill archives. not do
prize winner passed away. that reflects the power of that price, a century still honoring people using pulitzer same. it does something that shares of the nobel peace prize. if you look carefully, nobel peace prizes given to people in danger, for democracy trying to bring about peace and dangerous place like northern ireland. the reason the price is given because you're not going to go and fascinate somebody who just won the nobel peace prize. it's bringing world attention. the most significant pulitzer prize is the one for public service been given to newspapers daringly covering something the community didn't want them to cover. the journalists are ostracized, the local towns often pull out their advertisements and the newspaper's right about some lame it could be a scandal, but the community doesn't want to hear about it. when i got the pulitzer prize, it's a recognition, national recognition and in a sense provides the same umbrella of protection to people who are daring. >> postservice and extraordinarily significant person who still to this day affects our lives. jessica child ma
described with great exuberance the naval battle using wine glasses and decanters to show the position of the ships and blowing smoke from his cigar to imitate the cannon fire. it would have been wonderful to have been there. the topic at churchill's table were wide-ranging, and cold, exploding harbors, movies, that hamilton woman was a great favorite of churchill's, and politics. his curiosity was boundless. many of his guests wrote to friends or recorded in their diaries his conversations, repeated his anecdotes and commented on the foodie served. in addition i found hundreds of bills for dinner she gave at hundred hotels, the ritz, guest lists, amended wine lists, many letters from churchill complaining about overbilling, banking his friends for gifts of food and wine, ringing generous tips for hotel waiters call in the archives, all set out in my book. i have produced many of the menus in my book in case any of you want to try to duplicate one or two of them at a special party at home. the wine list might be harder for you to replicate since so many decades have passed since church
by colleagues is with me, doug peterson, who just joined us from citi, and he is heading up standard & poor's ratings, and we welcome you, doug. and doug has lived with citi all over the world and as such as lived quite a bit of time in japan itself. so it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of debt cry cease and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot in what we needed to be able to do. so we were able to convince him, and so now i'm not talking to you as his friend, i'm talking to you as his publisher. [laughter] and we had this decision, you know, we were going to do this book, and we kid. and we did. now, the ink wasn't even dry on this book when henry kissinger came out and sai
billion u.s., ten trillion yen, 2.2% of gdp. a lot of that would go to infrastructure, a lot to the north to the earthquake area, but, of course, we've seen 14 such packages since the late 1990s. and this one has to be different. and also he's pressing the bank of japan. last time i was here was to introduce governor shirakawa several years ago who i think is a very good governor of one of the major central banks in the world, pressing him to put in more monetary stimulus which i think is necessary. but i, one of the points that was made right in this room several years ago by governor shirakawa, and i've been with him three times in the last two months, is, you know, monetary and fiscal stimulus aren't enough n. the case of japan, you need major deregulation. i think major structural reforms, deregulation in the service area. so, hopefully, that'll all flow into the package of the new prime minister. certainly, a tough job -- it's a tough job, but this is the world's third largest economy, and if we don't get japan moving with some of the other problems with europe, etc., i think the wor
you so much, patrick james are with us. again the book is "the international relations of middle-earth: learning from the lord of the rings" this has been the scholar circle. i am maria armoudian and we will see you next week. >> guest: thank you so much. >> and her work, "pat nixon," mary brennan recounts the life. mrs. nixon's recent release private documents. this is just over 15 minutes. >> welcome to the richard nixon presidential library and museum. my name is paul paul wormser anm acting director of the library. i appreciate all of you, into one american canoeing author top presentations. today we are very fortunate to have really the leading scholar on pat nixon who was born 100 years ago this year. mary brennan, who did much of the research here for her book, is the chair of the department of history at the university of texas and san marcos. her specialty is post-world war ii conservative movement then she has written to date three different books. that's been turning right at the 16th, capture of the gop, wives and mothers and the conservative fundament crusade against
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)